The Sessions Colour Calculator is an interactive colour wheel that helps designers select HTML, RGB, or CMYK colours and identifies colour harmonies and schemes. Our Colour Wheel works faster than any other colour wheel or html colour chart.

Designers may save HTML safe colour values, CMYK color schemes, or RGB colours to an integrated clipboard and email the colours to colleagues or clients. You can also rotate shapes on the colour wheel to identify harmonious color schemes, adjust the saturation and lightness of colours, or select a colour plan to use for a corporate identity or design project.

Colours may be selected and applied to both print and Web design – the Sessions color wheel color calculator saves hours of work. A color scheme can be further refined by choosing different designs or patterns with different complexity levels.

For a thorough examination of Colour, its systems, interactions and how to advantageously use this knowledge in art and design, please see Colour Theory.

FLOWER BLOOM

Ecotones: Mitigating NYC’s Contentious Sites

Given the global and local challenges of climate change, the Landscape Architecture profession is at the forefront of New York City’s sustainability efforts.

Collaborating with governments, regulatory agencies, community groups, and design professionals, Landscape Architects are transforming ecological problems into opportunities for habitation and recreation.

With Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s sustainability plan, plaNYC, in place, the challenge is to understand the interconnectedness of the City’s green spaces.

Ecotones are transition zones between adjacent ecosystems.

In urban environments they emerge as contentious sites located between disparate or opposing forces: where industry meets the river; where community and industrial uses collide; where public and private interests merge.

These areas are often the unconsidered result of infrastructure improvements and building developments yet have the potential to be cultural and ecological mitigators.

The projects in this exhibition show us how sustainable practices, specifically, the collecting, cleansing, and reclaiming of water, can be used to mediate conflicting circumstances, integrating technical solutions with the social and cultural considerations that make for vibrant urban spaces.

more: www.aiany.org/centerforarchitectu… (28)

design directory: Center for Architecture > Architecture Galleries

ROYAL MONCEAU DESTRUCTION PARTY

http://www.leshommesfashion.com/

One thank you: Jean-Paul Lespagnard, and just one adjective:

JACQUELINE-DANCING-TRAMPOLINE-JUMPING-AVAF-NEON-PYRAMID-PRISM-SINGING-VAVA-BUBBLE-GROOVING-SILICONE-SPERMIN-ZODIAC-BUCKET-CHAMPAGNE-FLOWING-WANG-DU-ZODIAC-MYSTERY-POLE-BREAKDANCING-JOHN-KNOLLET-MARC-TURLAN-CUTTING-CRUNCHY-WEARING-I-LOVE-JP-STICKERING-ALAIN-DELON-DOOR-TRASHIN-GLASSES-BREAKIN-KOLKOZE-FRAMING-OURSLER-SMOKING-GOOD.

Gareth_3

Gareth_pugh_2

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Ryan Gander, The Boy Who Always Looked Up, 2003. 200 children’s storybooks on a shelf, 14 1/8 x 78 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. (35.9 x 200 x 17.1 cm)

The British artist Ryan Gander weaves subtle tapestries of fact and fiction. His idea-based practice, his handling of the details of life and his own biography, art history and the artistic process, even obscure fables and puzzles—all of these he synthesizes into myriad forms, from sculpture to installation, the printed word, performance, and intervention.

He has created, for instance, an installation in which viewers are positioned on the wrong side of a cinema screen, and a book on high-rise living that is positioned above the audience’s heads. In What the Postman Brought (2007), disparate items are loosely collected, and viewers are invited to complete the space between the (missing) objects.

Gander’s cerebral but playful puzzle incorporates various visual clues: the painting of the American artist Mark Tansey (whose work is similarly allusive, often exploring abstract concepts through somewhat realistic images), a children’s adventure-mystery book whose story develops as puzzles are solved, and the Irish comedian Spike Milligan’s ironic and emotionally raw writings.

An Incomplete History of Ryan Gander
by Jens Hoffmann

The London-based artist Ryan Gander connects what appear upon first glance to be prosaic historical facts and events with a large collection of fictional and semifictional elements. His works include photographs, drawings, films, installations, sculptures, and even lectures, all of them intertwined by a fractured, opaque narrative that threads through his entire oeuvre. The finished pieces are surprisingly minimal, but they suggest a variety of points of reference, from the utopian impulses of the early twentieth century to contemporary popular culture and mundane aspects of everyday life.

The Boy Who Always Looked Up (2003) exemplifies Gander’s approach perfectly. The primary component of the piece is a children’s book that the artist wrote himself about a boy in a small house across from the infamous Trellick Tower, which was designed by the British modernist architect Ernö Goldfinger in London’s Notting Hill. The story of the building and its creation is told through the eyes of the child, and a large number of exquisite illustrations show him watching its construction. A minimalist bookshelf holding numerous copies of The Boy Who Always Looked Up is installed high on the museum or gallery wall, out of the audience’s reach. Only in the bookshop can viewers actually handle and acquire the book so that they can finally read the story after leaving the exhibition space. The fact that Goldfinger was the neighbor of Ian Fleming (author of the renowned James Bond spy novel series) in London’s Highgate neighborhood and the inspiration for the Bond character Goldfinger is something that the artist carefully notes in a separate piece as part of his ongoing lecture series Loose Associations 2.1 (begun 2002). Both works are part of a larger group that Gander calls An Incomplete History of Ideas (2002–6).

Another work from this same group, also dealing with both the legacy of modernism and the world of children, is Bauhaus Revisited (2003), a chess set designed in 1924 by Josef Hartwig, a master craftsman at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. The chess set’s unique concept is that the shapes of the pieces indicate what moves can be made with them. It was originally intended to be mass produced but never went into production; Gander fabricates it as a unique piece of art using zebrawood, a rare, endangered wood found only in the rainforests of central Africa. The material’s black-and-white patterning makes it impossible to tell which side the pieces are supposed to be on, so the game cannot be played and the chess figures become, essentially, old-fashioned-looking children’s building blocks.

One of Gander’s most complex and yet most characteristic pieces is What the Postman Brought (2007), a subversion of museum display standards. It consists of four elements, three of which are missing. The fourth functions as a wall label, giving the viewer some clues about what might be going on in the absent parts. There are two nails in the wall, but the painting that is supposed to be hanging there (The Bricoleur’s Daughter [1987] by Mark Tansey) is gone. There is a bookstand, but the book (The Adventures of the Black Hand Gang [1976] by Hans Jürgen Press) has also disappeared. And the empty frame, we learn, was supposed to hold two documents from the unpublished writings of the Irish comedian Spike Milligan.

The film that Gander is presenting in his solo Passengers exhibition, Is This Guilt in You Too (Study of a Car in a Field) (2005), again employs a child as the narrator. In an enclosed space with white walls and white carpet, we watch a one-minute video loop of a car stuck in a snowy landscape near a group of trees. The camera slowly zooms in from above toward the car, and a voice-over by a young girl continues for about 15 minutes while the projection loops again and again. The girl speculates, just as we do, on how the car got there, describing carefully what we see on the screen.

Gander’s works are uncommonly hard to decipher. He sends us on a journey that is less about trying to arrive at an intellectual understanding and more about engaging in a form of detective work, which is often linked to the history of larger social structures and their relationships to the human condition. He lays out the evidence and asks us to study it carefully, connecting the different elements and forming our own personal relationship with them.

Tschumi’s Parc de la Villette in Paris.

It’s a precursor to Chicago’s Millennium Park.
The two urban parks do share a certain – object or form. At Parc de la Villette it looks like this:
” La Geode ” in the Paris park doubles as an IMAX Theater.

It shines and reflects and curves space in much the same way as a certain shiny object in a certain Chicago park that we have certainly written about – ” Cloud Gate ” – because that one is a shiny work of genius and we can’t get enough of it.
This, not purely round but in intriguing shapes, is a far superior work of art than the Geode in Paris. Theirs reflects space a la Newton, but ours bends space and light a la Einstein.

BAUHAUS

BAUHAUS

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Bauhaus 1919-1933

The Bauhaus occupies a place of its own in the history of 20th century culture, architecture, design, art and new media. One of the first schools of design, it brought together a number of the most outstanding contemporary architects and artists and was not only an innovative training centre but also a place of production and a focus of international debate. At a time when industrial society was in the grip of a crisis, the Bauhaus stood almost alone in asking how the modernisation process could be mastered by means of design.

Founded in Weimar in 1919, the Bauhaus rallied masters and students who sought to reverse the split between art and production by returning to the crafts as the foundation of all artistic activity and developing exemplary designs for objects and spaces that were to form part of a more human future society. Following intense internal debate, in 1923 the Bauhaus turned its attention to industry under its founder and first director Walter Gropius (1883–1969). The major exhibition which opened in 1923, reflecting the revised principle of art and technology as a new unity, spanned the full spectrum of Bauhaus work. The Haus Am Horn provided a glimpse of a residential building of the future.

In 1924 funding for the Bauhaus was cut so drastically at the instigation of conservative forces that it had to seek a new home. The Bauhaus moved to Dessau at a time of rising economic fortunes, becoming the municipally funded School of Design. Almost all masters moved with it. Former students became junior masters in charge of the workshops. Famous works of art and architecture and influential designs were produced in Dessau in the years from 1926 to 1932.

Walter Gropius resigned as director on 1st April 1928 under the pressure of constant struggles for the Bauhaus survival. He was succeeded by the Swiss architect Hannes Meyer (1889–1954) whose work sought to shape a harmonious society. Cost-cutting industrial mass production was to make products affordable for the masses.

Under Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886–1969) the Bauhaus developed from 1930 into a technical school of architecture with subsidiary art and workshop departments.

Less is More

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (March 27, 1886, Aachen – August 17, 1969, Chicago .He is commonly referred to, and was addressed, as Mies, his surname. Along with Walter GropiusLe Corbusier andOscar Niemeyer, he is widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modern architecture.

THE MEANING

Mies pursued an ambitious lifelong mission to create a new architectural language that could be used to represent the new era of technology and production. He saw a need for an architecture expressive of and in harmony with his epoch, just as Gothic architecture was for an era of spiritualism. He applied a disciplined design process using rational thought to achieve his spiritual goals. He believed that the configuration and arrangement of every architectural element, particularly including the character of enclosed space, must contribute to a unified expression.

The self-educated Mies painstakingly studied the great philosophers and thinkers, past and present, to enhance his own understanding of the character and essential qualities of the technological times he lived in. More than perhaps any other practising pioneer of modernism, Mies mined the writings of philosophers and thinkers for ideas that were relevant to his architectural mission. Mies’ architecture was guided by principles at a high level of abstraction, and his own generalized descriptions of those principles intentionally leave much room for interpretation. Yet his buildings are executed as objects of beauty and craftsmanship, and seem very direct and simple when viewed in person.

Every aspect of his architecture, from overall concept to the smallest detail, supports his effort to express the modern age. The depth of meaning conveyed by his work, beyond its aesthetic qualities, has drawn many contemporary philosophers and theoretical thinkers to continue to further explore and speculate about his architecture.

The Seagram Building NY

THE HAUTE BRIDE

Next year, bridal gowns go high fashion.

Oscar de la Renta.
(Photo: Dan Lecca)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bridal Week is usually regulated to red-headed step-child status in the fashion world—and rightfully so. All those shiny white dresses start to look hypnotically similar, and what the designers lack in creativity, they make up for in rhinestones. The spring 2008 season, which wrapped up last week, showed off gowns that were, for once, more high fashion and less David’s Bridal. Designers like Oscar de la Renta, Carolina Herrera, Monique Lhuillier, Elizabeth Filmore, and Reem Acra dared to stray from the usual formulaic looks and offered up off-the-shoulder dresses, pleats and ruffles, and even pastels. The showstopper of the week: Reem Acra’s silk taffeta cape gown with an embroidered belt (look 25). Next year, save the lace and satin for your tablecloths.

http://nymag.com/weddings/brides/31235/

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My LOVE STORY

ADRIANA SASSOON, Massachusetts

Founded by Adriana Sassoon in 2006, Adriana Sassoon has a unique background in fashion and beauty and is one of those rare people – whether behind the scenes or in front of the camera- that achieves what she sets out to accomplish. At age thirteen, an age at which a young person’s ideas are still fluid, she knew she had a particular fondness for the classical disciplines. She was already flirting with fashion working as a top model for Elite Model Management where her beauty appeared in countless magazine advertisements, fashion shows, and television commercials. from her native Sao Paulo, Brazil, Adriana graduated “The Ecole des Beaux’s- Arts” with her first degree in Industrial Design before arriving in the United States where she received a second degree in Interior Design from the FIDM Los Angeles. Adriana, who is fluent in Portuguese, Spanish, French and English, has an elite work history – A Docent for the French Trade Commission Exhibition “Les Paris des Createurs”. Adriana always kept a close eye on fashion. “I pick up on its vibrations”. Adriana embarks into the realm of fashion accessories as she proudly introduces her latest project. The creation of “Adriana Sassoon Handbags ” is a supported idea by her family and friends Adriana Sassoon has a Handbag Company with the focus in Minimalist Design. The main ingredient is to help a Charity founded by her father and mentor as well as charities that work with children of developing countries”….“If I can make a difference by doing what I love and being able to help others in need, what a marvelous accomplishment! AKS”.

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