SEXUAL COLOR


Art exhibit Sexual Color by Gabriel Wickbold at No Borders for Design Showroom em Miami

@miamidesigndistrict @nbfdesign @sassoonadriana @andreafunaro @soninhavilela @framjunqueira2 @artefundamental @gabrielwickbold @olivermoveis #brazilian #brazilianart #photography #arte #artebrasileira #contemporaneos #design #arquitetura #architecture

Sexual Color

Photographic exhibition, research laboratory of images and interaction with people, re-reading of famous and sexy bodies. Choose one of these labels (or all at once) and apply on Sexual Color of Gabriel Wickbold, work scheduled to be shown in the second half of 2010, in New York. Pointing his lenses and projecting his pop light on a mixture of materials, organic or inorganic, onto human skin, the young, 25 year old photographer from São Paulo, reaches an unique way of seeing sexuality, covering to strip. He explains: ‘‘The paint is a protection and at the same time revealing. It covers a woman, but in character, reveals itself.’’ To achieve this effect, Brazilian personalities such as Adriane Galisteu, Fernanda Paes Leme, Didi Wagner, Natalia Rodrigues, Fernanda Souza, Adriana Bombom, Barbara Koboldt, and Carla Fiorito, undressed (the majority for the first time) and had their beautiful forms covered with chocolate, gouache, airbrush paint, synthetic hair, coconut vines, sand and makeup, not necessarily in that order. Dismissing stereotypes, Sexual Color reinvents and exports the Brazilian beauty in a format that you have never seen. Check it out and participate.

The project Sexual Colors is his maximum example. In it, women and men have their bodies intertwined in paints and threads in an explosion of colors, lights, transparency and details that reveal a true visual orgasm. For Gabriel, the atmosphere created by his images illustrates an extremely artistic eroticism. ‘‘Sexual Color is work that purely reflects sex art. It portrays everything i would like to perform in a nude photograph. Sexuality involves curiosity. It is no fun if it’s too explicit. Insinuating generates much more sex appeal then merely giving it away.’’


https://gabrielwickbold.carbonmade.com/

MISSONI BAIA’S 249 BAYFRONT RESIDENCES CELEBRATE THE TIMELESS APPEAL OF WATERFRONT LIVING IN RELAXED, MODERN STYLE. IT CUTS A PROMINENT FIGURE ON THE MIAMI SKYLINE AND ON EAST EDGEWATER’S WATERFRONT. MISSONI BAIA SOARS 57 FLOORS INTO THE AIR AND SPANS AN IMPRESSIVE 200 FEET ALONG BISCAYNE BAY.

ANGELA MISSONI CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF THIS NEW GENERATION

The Missoni brand is very much synonymous with the Missoni family. Angela Missoni, the founding couple’s daughter, took over from Rosita as the firm’s creative director in 1997 and now leads the legendary label. As the creative force behind the entire house of Missoni, Angela has taken the company in new directions while remaining true to its heritage. She developed a new way to approach the Missoni image and communications, establishing a new position for the brand in the world of fashion. Angela has initiated new and important collaborations with talents like Carine Roitfeld, Mario Testino, Edward Enninful, Mario Sorrenti, Mert and Marcus, and Juergen Teller, Viviane Sassen, Mark Borthwick and Harley Weir. Most recently she has worked with Oscar-winning Italian director Paolo Sorrentino and actress, model and philanthropist Elisa Sednaoui to launch the latest Missoni fragrance worldwide.

Through the decades, Angela has been involved in projects that focus on reinforcing global awareness of the brand, and the growth of the family business. Amid that work emerged the study of the latest concept for the Missoni boutiques worldwide. For this, Angela worked closely with world-famous architect Patricia Urquiola. Together they created an organic environment that plays on various tones and textures, in order to give maximal visibility to the strong aesthetic of all the Missoni collections, elements of which ultimately become protagonists in a space.
The influential magazine Women’s Wear Daily has praised Missoni’s designs under her creative direction: “Angela Missoni is the scion of a decades-old family dynasty, but she’s still breaking new ground.” Now Angela and OKO Group have come together to bring the singular Missoni style to life in the brand’s first-ever residential development.



LOBBY LEVEL

Triple ceiling height in lobby reception

Personal concierge and 24-hour front desk attendant

Package room for deliveries

Valet parking service

Indoor bayside lounge

Outdoor bayside terrace

Extensive landscaping of outdoor terraces for privacy

Baywalk access overlooking the bay

5TH FLOOR

Hair and nail salon

Kids’ club and indoor play-area

Pet spa

On-site building manager’s office

Resident game room with billiard table, bar, large video screen and lounge seating

6TH FLOOR
Expansive outdoor deck with multiple lounge seating areas

Bayside terrace with cantilevered pool overlooking the bay

Indoor bay-terrace lounge with double ceiling height

Resident private dining and party room

Private screening room

7TH FLOOR
1,700 square-foot gym with 180° views of the bay 

Private yoga studio

Private training room 

Men’s and women’s locker rooms

Expansive residents’ only spa with men’s and women’s sauna and steam rooms, and private massage treatment rooms with showers

7TH FLOOR, POOL DECK
Outdoor bridge connecting the seventh-floor building amenities to pool deck

Olympic-length lap pool

Lounge pool

Outdoor whirlpool spa

Poolside daybeds

Kids’ splash-pad water play area

Children’s play lawn

Outdoor barbeque and bar cabana for al fresco dining

Two poolside resident lounges

Men’s and women’s private locker rooms

Elevated tennis court


BISCAYNE BAY WATERFRONT VIEWS IN EVERY DIRECTION

The panoramic views from Missoni Baia sweep in all directions, revealing Biscayne Bay, Downtown Miami, Miami Beach and the Atlantic Ocean.


Missoni Baia was thoughtfully designed to ensure that its 249 one- to five-bedroom condominium homes, ranging in size from 776 to 3,788 square feet (72 to 352 square meters), all have sweeping views of the city, the bay, Miami Beach, or the Atlantic Ocean.

Located at the nexus of the city’s most creative, culturally rich neighborhoods, East Edgewater speaks to the passion for art and the embrace of the carefree, casually luxurious good life that are at the core of the Missoni philosophy. The luxury Edgewater Miami condos are nestled between Biscayne Bay and the dynamic Design District—making it central to everything one needs.


SHOPPING

The world’s most iconic luxury brands have set up shop in the art-filled environs of the Design District. Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, Burberry, Loewe, Officine Panerai, Rolex, Tom Ford, Dior, and Christian Louboutin are just a few of the internationally renowned boutiques in Miami’s most exciting shopping destination.

20130910-150308.jpg
Fashion designer

Óscar Arístides Ortiz de la Renta Fiallo is one of the world’s leading fashion designers. Trained by Cristóbal Balenciaga and Antonio Castillo, he became internationally known in the 1960s as one of the couturiers to dress Jacqueline Kennedy.

Born: July 22, 1932 (age 81), Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Children: Moises de la Renta
Spouse: Annette de la Renta (m. 1989), Françoise de Langlade (m. 1967–1983)

Nationality: American, Dominican

Parents: Óscar Avelino de la Renta, María Antonia Fiallo

NYFW 2013 Fall Collection

20130910-150327.jpg

20130910-150334.jpg
The big wow factor was left to the two grand silk faille ball gowns with gold bullion embroidery one in shocking pink, and the other in mulberry were the stars of The Collection fall 2013-2014.
Oscar de la Renta Official

20130910-152944.jpg

ALTERNATIVE HAIR LONDON 2012

london alternative hair 2012

Tony Rizzo has announced that there will be a special tribute to Vidal Sassoon at the 2012 Alternative Hair Show.

Following the sad loss of Vidal Sassoon – who amongst his many other accolades also took the role of Worldwide Honorary Patron of the Alternative Hair Show – it has been announced that there will be a special tribute presentation to the ultimate hairdressing icon during this year’s event.

The theme for the 2012 show is, appropriately, Legends, and this year also sees Alternative Hair celebrate its 30th anniversary.

The 2012 Alternative Hair Show will take place on the evening of Sunday 14 October at the Royal Albert Hall, London.

An event not to be missed, tickets are available to book now at www.alternativehair.org

Adriana Sassoon

adriana sassoon adriana sassoon londonadriana sassoonadriana sassoonadriana sassoon

sassoon elan eden adriana

320519084_4652da6c331

VIDAL  SASSOON  STYLE  HAIR

Early life

Vidal Sassoon é um cabeleireiro inglês, nascido em Londres, em 1928. Nos Estados Unidos estudou na universidade de Nova Iorque. Como cabeleireiro, notablizou-se por ter criado uma forma de penteado baseada na Bauhaus e nas formas geométricas.Vencedor de vário prémios, foi presidente da Multinacional Vidal Sassoon, presidente da Fundação Vidal Sassoon .

sassoon_picbeauty_5172_0_sl

Influence in hairstyling

Sassoon’s works include the geometric, the wash-and-wear perm, and the “Nancy Kwan.” They were all modern and low-maintenance. The hairstyles created by Sassoon relied on dark, straight, and shiny hair cut into geometric yet organic shapes. In 1963, Sassoon created a short, angular hairstyle cut on a horizontal plane that was the recreation of the classic “bob cut.” His geometric haircuts seemed to be severely cut, but were entirely lacquer-free, relying on the natural shine of the hair for effect. Sassoon is a father of modernist style and has also been a key force in the commercial direction of hair styling, turning its craft in to a multi-million dollar industry.

He was a very influential person to people all over the world; especially those who have become cosmetologists. By the early 1980s, after moving to the United States, Sassoon had sold his name to manufacturers of haircare products and the multinational Procter & Gamble was applying his name to shampoos and conditioners sold worldwide. Former salon colleagues also bought Sassoon’s salons and acquired the right to use his name, extending the brand in salons into the United Kingdom and United States. However, in 2003, it was reported that Sassoon was suing Procter & Gamble for destroying his brand by skimping on marketing in favor of the company’s other hair product lines, notably Pantene. Also in 2002, the chain of Vidal Sassoon salons was sold to Regis Corporation. By 2004, it was reported that he was no longer associated with the brand that bears his name.[citation needed] Vidal Sassoon has authored several books, including A Year of Beauty and Health co-written with his former wife, Beverly Sassoon. He also had a short-lived TV series called Your New Day with Vidal Sassoon in the late 1970s.

Family

In 1967, Vidal Sassoon married Beverly Adams. They had four children,CATYA, ELAN, EDEN  including an adopted son DAVID. One daughter, actress Catya Sassoon, died of a drug overdose on January 1, 2002. The couple divorced in 1980.

 sassoon-trend-51172

 Quote

Hair is nature’s biggest compliment and the treatment of this compliment is in our hands. As in couture, the cut is the most important element … haircutting simply means design and this feeling for design must come from within. ”VS
The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary. ”VSsassoon-trend-51202

SASSOON STYLING PRODUCTS

vs-logo-11

Vidal Sassoon stands for Very Simple and Very Stylish! Vidal Sassoon is the consumer brand that experts use when it comes to delivering fabulous haircare. The best of technology is used by Vidal Sassoon to deliver the ultimate in hair styling product expertise. Vidal Sassoon’s products are for the modern individual with the know-how and expectation of living in the 21st century.

Vidal Sassoon’s hair styling products are renowned in the world of fashion for bringing style and confidence to today’s image conscious consumer. Innovation, experience and value are all top of the agenda with Vidal Sassoon, the world leading authority on haircare.

Vidal Sassoon brings the vital hair styling tools for the modern sophisticate enabling you to create those elegant, silky and shiny looks.

sassoon_pichover_5747_0_sl

www.sassoon.com

ROGER VIVIER

vivier1

  • Born: Paris, 13 November 1913.
  • Education: Studied sculpture at l’École des Beaux Arts, Paris.
  • Family: Adopted son, Gérard Benoit-Vivier.
  • Military Service: Performed military service, 1938-39.
  • Career: Designed shoe collection for friend’s shoe factory; opened own , 1937, designing for Pinet and  in France, Miller and Delman in U.S., Rayne and Turner in UK; designed exclusively for Delman, New York, 1940-41 and 1945-47; studied millinery, 1942; opened New York store, Suzanne & Roger, with milliner Suzanne Remy, 1945; returned to Paris, 1947, designing freelance; designed for Dior’s new shoe department, 1953-63; showed signature collections, from 1963; reopened own business in Paris, 1963; designs collections for houses, including Grés, St. Laurent, Ungaro, and Balmain; resigned with Delman, 1992-94; new licensing  with Rautureau, 1994; opened new Paris boutique, 1995.
  • Exhibitions: Musée des Arts de la Mode, Paris, 1987 [retrospective]; Nina Footwear Showroom, New York, [retrospective], 1998; Folies de dentelles, Musée des Beaux-arts et de la dentelle, Alençon, France, 2000.
  • Awards: Neiman Marcus award, 1961; Daniel & Fischer award; Riberio d’; honored by Nina Footwear, 1998.
  • Died: 2 October 1998, in Toulouse, France.
  • rogervivier

Roger Vivier was perhaps the most innovative shoe designer of the 20th century and beyond. Vivier’s shoes have had the remarkable ability to seem avant-garde yet destined at the same time to become classics. He maintained an eye for the cutting edge of fashion for six decades. Vivier looked back into the history of fashion and forward to the disciplines of engineering and science for inspiration. The shoes may seem shocking at first; however, it is the way they complete the  that has made Vivier so coveted by top fashion designers for decades. With a sophisticated eye for line, form, and the use of innovative materials, Vivier created  worn by some of the most and prestigious people of both the 20th and 21st centuries, among them Diana Vreeland, the Queen of England, and Marlene Dietrich.

roger vivier shoes, roger vivier paris

Vivier worked with some of the most innovative fashion designers, such as , Christian Dior, and Yves Saint Laurent, at the height of their careers. Schiaparelli was the first designer to include Vivier’s shoes in her collections. Vivier was working for the American firm Delman at the time; Delman rejected Vivier’s sketch of the shocking platform shoe which Schiaparelli included in her 1938 collection. In 1947 Vivier began to work for  and the New Look brought new emphasis to the  and foot. Vivier created a number of new  shapes for Dior, including the  and the  heel. During their ten-year association, Dior and Vivier created a golden era of design. In the 1960s Vivier created the low heeled “pilgrim pump” with a square silver , and this shoe is often cited as fashion’s most copied footwear.

roger vivier shoes

Vivier was one of the first designers to use clear plastic in the design of shoes. His first plastic designs were created in the late 1940s after World War II; however, in the early 1960s he created entire collections in plastic. Vivier popularized the acceptance of the thigh-high boot in the mid-1960s, a fashion considered  for women. Vivier teamed with Delman again in 1992, and the mood his later collections continued to be imaginative and forward thinking. Drawing his inspiration from nature, contemporary fashion, the history of fashion, painting, and literature, Vivier updated some of his earlier designs and was constantly creating new ones to challenge the ideas of footwear design.

roger-vivier- shoes

Vivier studied sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and later apprenticed at a shoe factory. It was this solid base of training in both aesthetics and technical skills that led him to become known for precision fit as well as innovative design. A Vogue ad for his shoes in 1953 educates the viewer to look beyond the design. Showing the shoes embraced in callipers and other precision tools the ad read, “Now study the heel. It announces an entirely new principle—the heel moved forward, where it carries the body’s weight better.” In another ad from Vogue (1954) the experience of owning a pair of Vivier shoes was likened to owning a  suit or dress, “a perfection of fit and .”

roger-vivier shoulder bag

Vivier’s shoes not only had the ability to complete a silhouette with an  that made a whole, but the beauty of their line, form, and  made them creations that stood alone as objects of art. Vivier’s strong combination of design and craftsmanship allowed his shoes to stand prominently in the permanent collections of some of the world’s most prestigious museums—the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and the Musée du Costume et de la Mode of the Louvre, Paris.

roger-vivier-paris

In 1994 the 86-year-old Vivier signed a new licensing agreement with Rautureau Apple Shoes, which in turn allowed him to open a  in Paris the following year. The Rautureau venture gave Vivier the backing to continue doing what he loved most—designing shoes. Yet three years later, in October 1998, Vivier died in Toulouse, France. He was remembered by many, including fellow shoe designer , who told People magazine, “People try to copy him, but it’s impossible to find that mix of technical skill and design.” Kenneth Jay Lane, who had worked with the master , declared, “He was the world’s greatest artist of shoe design.”

roger-vivier-apartment

An invaluable collection of great design! Offering a range of styles, the interiors represent the best from the late 1960s into the first years of the 70s. Included are Britwell Salome’s estate designed by David Hicks, Federico Forquet’s apartment in Rome, Roger Vivier’s apartment in Paris, Maurice Rheims’ apartment in Paris, Lagerfeld’s Paris apartment including the bathroom, Valentino’s apartment in Rome, Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, Count Panza’s apartment in Milan, the Paris home of Quasar and Emmanuelle Khanh, and the apartment of Gunther Sachs in the Palace Hotel in Saint-Moritz. This collection profiles the work of Serge Royaux, David Mlinaric, Jacques Thual, Aldo Jacober, David Hicks, Jean Dive, Piero Pinto, Michel Cruchot, Gerard Gallet, Alberto Pinto, Yves Vidal and Charles Sevigny, Anita Bachman, Michel Boix-Vives, Alain Demachy, Jacques Demachy, Jay Spectre, Marc du Plantier, Yves Houdin, Francois Catroux, John Stefanidis, Henri Samuel, Didier Aaron, Jean-Paul Faye, Gae Aulenti, Gerard Gallet, Jacques Simon, Pierre Sels, Paolo Tommasi, Michel Boyer,Maria Pergay, Isabelle Hebey, Martine Dufour, Andre Putman, Francois Arnal and Atelier A, Nanda Vigo, architect Claudio Dini, architect Michel Sadirac, architect Carla Venosta, architect Lawrence Michaels, architect Arthur Finn, and the Swiss house by Marcel Breuer.

roger vivier paris

roger vivier-bag

roger vivier bag

roger-vivier

Bruno_ines_2 Vivier_display Ddvalle

Left to right: Creative Director Bruno Frison with Ines de la Fressange; A display of Roger Vivier shoes; Diego Della Valle, CEO of Tod’s Group.

INES DE LA FRESSANGE

ines-de-la-fressange

Inès Marie Lætitia Églantine Isabelle de Seignard de la Fressange (born 11 August 1957), is a French supermodel and designer of fashion and perfumes.

She was born in Gassin, Var, France. Her French father, André de Seignard de La Fressange (b. 1932) (a marquis), was a stockbroker, and her mother, Cecilia Sanchez-Cirez, was an Argentine model. She grew up in an 18th-century mill outside Paris with three brothers. Her grandmother was Madame Simone Jacquinot, heiress to the Lazard banking fortune.

ines de la fressange

In the 1980s, she became the first model to sign an exclusive modeling contract with an haute couture fashion house, Chanel, by fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, whose muse she became. However, in 1989, Lagerfeld and De la Fressange had an argument and parted company. Likely this argument was, at least in part, regarding her decision to lend her likeness to a bust of Marianne, the ubiquitous symbol of the French republic. Lagerfeld reputedly condemned her decision, saying Marianne was the embodiment of “everything that is boring, bourgeois, and provincial” and that he would not dress up historic monuments.

In 1990, she married Luigi d’Urso (d. March 23, 2006), an Italian railroad executive, with whom she had two daughters.

ines-pour-chanel

Currently, De la Fressange does not model very often. Instead, she is a businesswoman with a chain of clothing boutiques, a designer, and a consultant for Jean-Paul Gaultier. She presented a creation by Gaultier for his Spring/Summer 2009 haute couture collection at the Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week and walked the runway for Gaultier during the event, at age 51.

PUBLICATIONS

By Vivier:

    Books

  • Vivier, Paris, 1979.
  • Vivier, Roger, and Cynthia Hampton, Les souliers de Roger Vivier [exhibition catalogue], Paris, 1987.

On Vivier:

    Books

  • Swann, June, Shoes, London, 1982.
  • McDowell, Colin, Shoes: Fashion and Fantasy, New York, 1989.
  • Trasko, Mary, Heavenly Soles: Extraordinary Twentieth-Century Shoes, New York, 1989.
  • Provoyer, Pierre, Vivier, Paris, 1991.
  • Pringle, Colombe, Roger Vivier, New York & London, 1999.
  • Musée des Beaux-arts et de la dentelle, Folies de dentelles, [exhibition catalogue], Alençon, France, 2000.
    Articles

  • Cassullo, Joanne L., “Four Hundred Shoes,” in Next, December 1984.
  • Bricker, Charles, “Fashion Afoot: Roger Vivier, the Supreme Shoemaker Comes to New York,” in Connoisseur (New York), December 1986.
  • Buck, Joan J., “A Maker of Magic,” in Vogue (New York), December 1987.
  • “Styles,” in the New York Times, 9 August 1992.
  • Weisman, Katherine, “Rautureaus Sell Stake; Ink Vivier Deal,” in Footwear News, 28 February 1994.
  • Menkes, Suzy, “Master Cobbler Sets Up Shop Again,” in the International Herald Tribune, 24 January 1995.
  • Baber, Bonnie, et al., “The Design Masters,” in Footwear News, 17 April 1995.
  • Weisman, Katherine, “Roger Vivier, 90, Mourned by Shoe World,” in Footwear News, 12 October 1998.
  • “Died, Roger Vivier,” in Time, 19 October 1998.
  • “Roger Vivier, France’s Footwear Extraordinaire,” [obituary] in People, 26 October 1998.
  • Carmichael, Celia, “Legendary Status: Nina Honors the Creative Genius of Roger Vivier,” in Footwear News, 21 December 1998.— Dennita Sewell; updated by Sydonie Benét

*I always loved Roger Vivier’s designs.Takes me back in time. Is romantic, aristocratic and timeless.Thirteen years ago, I did a project called Palais Royal and Roger and Chanel were my inspiration.

adriana sassoon

www.rogervivier.com

WOMEN’S FASHION 1930

1930 paris

WOMEN’S FASHION 1930

In the 1930s there was a return to a more genteel, ladylike appearance. Budding rounded busts and waistline curves were seen and hair became softer and prettier as hair perms improved. Foreheads which had been hidden by cloche hats were revealed and adorned with small plate shaped hats. Clothes were feminine, sweet and tidy by day with a return to real glamour at night.

The French designer Madeleine Vionnet opened her own fashion house in 1912. She devised methods of bias cross cutting during the 1920s using a miniature model. She made popular the halter neck and the cowl neck.

1930

The bias method has often been used to add a flirtatious and elegant quality to clothes. To make a piece of fabric hang and drape in sinuous folds and stretch over the round contours of the body, fabric pattern pieces can be cut not on the straight grain, but at an angle of 45 degrees. 

It is sometimes said that Vionnet invented bias cutting, but historical evidence suggests that close fitting gowns and veils of the medieval period were made with cross cut fabrics. The Edwardians also made skirts that swayed to the back by joining a bias edge to a straight grain edge and the result was a pull to the back that formed the trained skirt. She did really popularise it and the resulting clothes are styles we forever associate with movie goddesses and dancers like Ginger Rogers. 

fallgold-704452

Using her technique designers were able to produce magnificent gowns in satins, crepe-de-chines, silks, crepes and chiffons by cross cutting the fabric, creating a flare and fluidity of drapery that other methods could not achieve. Many of the gowns could be slipped over the head and came alive when put on the human form. Some evening garments made women look like Grecian goddesses whilst others made them look like half naked sexy vamps. Certain of her gowns still look quite contemporary.

 

141

 

There was a passion for sunbathing. Women tried to get tans and then show them off under full length backless evening dresses cut on the true cross or bias and which moulded to the body. To show off the styles a slim figure was essential and that was getting easier for women who were educated and aware as many now used contraception and did not have to bear baby after baby unless desired. 

goldie-hawn-vogue-photo-300x300

The new improved fabrics like rayon had several finishes and gave various effects exploited by designers eager to work with new materials. Cotton was also used by Chanel and suddenly it was considered more than a cheap fabric for work clothes. But nothing cut and looked like pure silk and it was still the best fabric to capture the folds and drapes of thirties couture. Fine wool crepes also moulded to the body and fell into beautiful godets and pleats.

Schiaparelli liked new things as well as new ideas. In 1933 she promoted the fastener we call the zip or zipper. The metal zip had been invented in 1893 and by 1917 it was somewhat timidly used for shoes, tobacco pouches and U.S. Navy windcheater jackets. Her use of the new plastic coloured zip in fashion clothes was both decorative, functional and highly novel. They soon became universally used and are now a very reliable form of fastening. 

glam2-709181

 

Health and fitness was an important aspect of thirties lifestyle. As sun worshipping became a common leisure pursuit fashion answered the needs of sun seekers by making chic outfits for the beach and its surrounds. Beach wraps, hold alls, soft hats and knitted bathing suits were all given the designer touch.

Swimwear was getting briefer and the back was scooped out so that women could develop tanned backs to show off at night in the backless and low backed dresses. The colours of the beach holiday were  navy, white, cream, grey, black and buff with touches of red.

1930s-orange-silk-crepe-floor-length-dress

Pyjamas introduced as informal dinner dress or nightwear for sleeping died quickly as fashions. However the third use of them as a practical beach outfit caught on and every woman made them an essential garment to pack. They were soon regarded as correct seaside wear. The trousers were sailor style, widely flared and flat fronted with buttons. They were made up in draping heavy crepe-de-chine. Blue and white tops or short jackets finished the holiday look.