CHAMBORD LIQUEUR

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Chambord is made from red and black raspberries, Madagascar vanilla, Moroccan citrus peel, honey and cognac.

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The raspberry is the edible fruit of a multitude of plant species in the genus Rubus of the rose family, most of which are in the subgenus Idaeobatus; the name also applies to these plants themselves. Raspberries are perennial with woody stems.

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Chambord Black Raspberry Liqueur is modelled after a raspberry liqueur produced in the Loire Valley of France during the late 17th century.
The liqueur was said to have been introduced to Louis XIV during one of his visits to the Château de Chambord.

Chambord is produced on the premises of a traditional Loire Valley chateau, using all natural ingredients.

Whole raspberries and blackberries are steeped in French spirits for a period of several weeks to produce a fruit infusion.
This infusion produces a distinct raspberry flavour and aroma.

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Chateau Chambord Loire Valley !!!!Travel…… This one of my passions in life. I’m glad I have an appreciation for architecture and history.
I’m a romantic person and at times nostalgic.

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The royal Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France, is one of the most recognizable châteaux in the world because of its very distinct French Renaissance architecture which blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Renaissance structures.

The building, which was never completed, was constructed by King François I.

Châteaux in the 16th-century departed from castle architecture; while they were off-shoots of castles, with features commonly associated with them, they did not have serious defences.
Extensive gardens and water features, such as a moat, were common amongst châteaux from this period.

Chambord is no exception to this pattern. Built in Renaissance style, the internal layout is an early example of the French and Italian style of grouping rooms into self-contained suites, a departure from the medieval style of corridor rooms.

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